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From CigarPad.com      (October 15, 2006)

 
 
 
Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 15 October 2006
 
     
  Tabacos de la CordilleraTM   ColinasTM Churchil   rating:  88



A little more than six months ago we had the opportunity to review a small brand cigar from Tabacos de la Cordillera named the Colinas. We sampled a few of the Robustos and were pleasantly surprised by the taste of the cigar, whose claim to fame is 100% genetically pure Cuban seed tobacco, which lends a Cuban flavor to the smoke without falling under the pesky import restrictions. Now, six months down the line we are reviewing the larger Churchill size of the same brand. Although some of the same minor problems still plague the latest Churchills that were present in the Robustos, overall the quality of the cigars has gotten a little better. The Colinas are only available through the company's website, at www.tabacordillera.com.

 
     
  The wrapper of the Colinas is a little darker than would be expected if the cigar was smoked blind, as the Colinas' intensity tips a little to the mild side. Visually the Colinas have a rustic look, with a few veins protruding from the not entirely smooth length of the cigar. Fears of an uneven smoke are quickly put to rest however as the cigar burns down to the band – that is, if the band is left on. We mentioned before that the band of the Colinas isn't very regal. Coupled with the fact that the Colinas come in bundles rather than boxes, these sticks look every bit the $2.85 cigar they are. However, the smoking experience leaves the smoker feeling like they got a value, and that they are smoking a higher priced boxed cigar.  
     
  One of the aforementioned minor problems is with the ash of the Colinas. As the cigar burns down the ash becomes textured and cracked, rather than the sharp as a razor, hard ash that we see in more premium cigars. This problem is only minor because it doesn't really affect the smoking experience, other than that the smoker needs to be more mindful that the ash doesn't suddenly drop into his or her lap. More typically, soft and cracked ash is indicative of a poorly constructed cigar – one that burns hot, fast, and uneven. The Colinas however, don't suffer from these problems. The cracked, black and gray streaked ash is simply less aesthetically pleasing than the solid white ash that we as smokers are used to seeing in cigar ads. In fact, the Colinas are a surprisingly cool smoke, and rarely is any correction to the burn necessary. Also, with the slow burn the Churchills become a fairly lengthy experience.  
     
  The only other true problem that can be said about the Colinas is lack of iron-clad consistency. This isn't to say that there are dramatic shifts in consistency from cigar to cigar, but there were times that the burn wasn't quite as even as the others, or where the taste wasn't the same as the other sticks. For the cigars that were similar, the flavors were mild but they blended together well. In fact, after the first 1/3 of the cigar it was difficult to differentiate much between the grassy, woody, and very slight metallic flavors. The flavor and intensity were mild, and were devoid of sweetness, bitterness, and saltiness.  
     
  Other than problems with consistency and ash, the Colinas were a very enjoyable smoke for the price. They are a great cigar to buy a bundle of to throw in the humidor when you just want to have a light, easy smoke that doesn't burn the mouth or throat, and will not leave a foul aftertaste in your mouth. These certainly won't replace your Cohibas, Fuentes, or Upmanns, but these may become a bundled cigar of preference. Because these aren't quite on par with some of the more premium names, we didn't score the Churchills much higher than the Robustos. However, it would seem that these do deserve a slightly higher score due to the enhancements made, although according to our scoring metric the overall score didn't come out to be higher than the 88 we gave the Robusto, most likely because the Robustos were slightly more consistent.
Last Updated ( Sunday, 15 October 2006 )
 
     
  Our final score for the Colinas Churchill cigar is: 88  
     
         
       
     

 


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